Pressure at the end

April 3, 2010 at 7:45 pm | Posted in 1 | Leave a comment

Last week I briefly touched upon static pressure ports in some of my other social media streams (http://www.facebook.com/people/Matthew-Fife/3215001). This week I would like to share a little bit more on this topic.

So what exactly are static pressure ports and why do we have them trailing the aircraft? One of the best sources of information I have found on this interesting piece of test equipment is actually Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trailing_Cone).

While all airplanes are able to measure the pressure surrounding the aircraft, test flight aircraft need to ensure the pressure they measure is the true ambient pressure. Unfortunately, pressure changes as the air flows over the aircraft. These changes are taken into consideration during the design of the aircraft pressure monitoring system. However, in order to validate these designs, test aircraft must be able to accurately measure the ambient pressure far away from the aircraft itself. By taking these measurements, engineers can be sure that the aircraft’s fuselage is not affecting the pressure measurement. Check out the picture below taken from Wikipedia. The pressure is measured using the trailing cone attached to the top of the vertical tail. In flight the trailing coneĀ  is allowed to drift further from the aircraft as more static pressure tubing is released.

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